Higher education space planning post-pandemic: The demand for flexible, hybrid workplaces

The university workplace has forever changed post-COVID and this webcast examines the toolbox of new hybrid and flexible space types and configurations that higher education workplaces will need to implement to recover and deliver on future goals. Elliot Felix details why this transformation is critical to future success, demonstrates the benefits to the students, institution, and staff, and illustrates how to plan, design, implement, and scale up the new flexible, hybrid workplace models in higher education.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

A case study in new, post-pandemic facility models for teaching and learning

In this webcast, session leaders examine shifts in planning and design of classrooms and buildings as a result of the pandemic. Lan Ying Ip and Stacey Chapman call upon a case study of the College of Education and Human Sciences at University of Nebraska to demonstrate how the elevated priorities of flexibility, technology integration, and highly specialized air handling equipment provided flexibility and resiliency. They detail facility features including transparency, classroom sizes, audio/visual technology for small and large group learning studios, collaboration lounges, and strategies to build communities with greater interdepartmental collaboration and student-student and student-faculty interaction.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

Campus building renewal: New decision-making criteria for today’s capital project action plans

Many university campuses are hamstrung by buildings past their useful life – costly-to-operate eyesores incompatible with modern program priorities. The question is, what is the best path toward renewal? Session leaders examine four project case studies from different institutions to demonstrate best practices, methods, and tools for assessing facility conditions and physical space configurations to optimize decisions about capital reinvestment. They illustrate trending metrics for sustainability, suitability for program use, first cost, and life-cycle costs, and identify common themes across building types, integrative methodologies comparing renewal options, and challenges and tradeoffs associated with renewal.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Dynamic innovation environments: Future-proofing long-term capital investments

The process of reconciling the competing themes of traditional vs. contemporary, broad vs. deep, micro vs. macro to create a building design “sweet spot” continues to evolve. Here you’ll see how that played out for Washington University in St. Louis in a new building for the Department of Computer Science with design strategies targeting flexible, foundational, adaptable, and enduring facilities. Presenters illustrate programming and space planning models for proximity, transparency, and convergence of people and ideas, and identify programmatic anchors in shared and public spaces that boost collaboration and put technical work on display to support recruitment, program building, and institutional reputation.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Strategies to support data-driven space decision making for space planning

In this webcast, Laura Serebin and Elizabeth Strutz present a primer on best practices for developing space planning categories and benchmarking metrics for academic, science and technology, healthcare, and workplace buildings. They demonstrate methods to leverage technology and develop decision support tools for comparing space metrics across multiple buildings. They identify qualitative and quantitative data collection methods to conduct space utilization studies, including several new technologies that use sensors for a higher level of accuracy.

O&M for new science buildings: What’s the number? Bridging the planning gap between “build” and “operate” to prevent post-construction operational failure

The criteria for project success is ultimately “build AND operate.”  Not just “build.”  Too many new science building capital projects end construction only to face O&M staffing that is too little, too late, and unprepared.  This results in building operational failures that damage whole science programs and cause financial losses for the sponsoring institutions.  Steve Westfall demonstrates here how the unique O&M manpower requirements for a new science building are actually knowable, quantitatively, years in advance of construction completion, and how that number can be used to drive institutional action plans for assuring that great new science buildings will be operationally successful, great new science buildings.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00

Residence hall construction cost control: Program influencers, budget levers, and market risk mitigation

Getting what you want out of every dollar isn't simply a product of smart residence hall programming and design - recognizing cost drivers from inception through construction is crucial to controlling your budget when the unexpected happens. Using case studies from three recent residence hall projects at top-tier institutions, Blair Tennant and Joe Stramberg will examine cost drivers, benchmarking, program influencers, cost control tools, and market influencers. They will demonstrate how these factors intersect and determine financial success; evaluate the decisions that influence construction costs; and show how this data ties into financial proformas and affordability.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

Interdisciplinary and entrepreneurial facility solutions that integrate previously-siloed programs

Facilities that integrate previously-siloed disciplines are unlocking space and program synergies, enhancing recruitment initiatives, and equipping students for tomorrow’s interdisciplinary and entrepreneurial problem solving. Vic Tortorelli examines strategic opportunities, decision-making, and post-occupancy results from Ursinus College’s new Innovation and Discovery Center (IDC), which was designed within the context of an extensive master planning study of the College’s science facilities.  Vic profiles teaching and research labs linking biology with other disciplines, such as psychology, biochemistry, and health and exercise physiology. He describes the design of active-learning classrooms, support spaces, and interdisciplinary centers incorporated within the IDC. 

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

AI, robotics, and data sciences: Raising the bar for next-gen facility competitiveness

To recruit and retain the brightest minds and tackle new challenges in artificial intelligence, robotics, cybersecurity, and cloud computing, higher ed institutions are now engaged in an arms race of high-powered data infrastructure, strategic industry partnerships, and innovative learning environments. John Walz profiles key capabilities of the just-opened Dwight and Dian Diercks Computational Science Hall and how they will advance MSOE’s priorities of turning out highly competitive, workforce-ready graduates, forging new alliances, and breaking new ground in technology innovation. He highlights distinguishing features of leading-edge classrooms and teaching labs, dedicated spaces for partnerships and faculty, a 250-seat auditorium for guest lectures, and, of course, an NVIDIA supercomputer.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

Thematic STEM vs. focused-discipline science buildings: Value-based analysis for today's competitive academic institutions

The benefits of collaborative science have triggered an interdisciplinary science and engineering building boom pressing institutions toward program convergence, shared physical resources, open workspace, and team-based research and education. But is this facility direction the right choice for your institution? Session leaders contrast the decision making and planning strategies that determined the designs of two distinct science facilities at University of Massachusetts, Amherst – one dedicated-science building and one built for trans-disciplinary groups. They detail benefits and pitfalls for each approach, illustrate solutions for unexpected mid-project changes, and deliver post-occupancy findings. 

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
AIA Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00