Transformative facilities for integrated-program growth and experiential learning

A combined-discipline facility and academic unit for chemistry, biology, and physics will support High Point University’s rapid program growth, expand experiential learning opportunities, support leading research initiatives, and enhance student and faculty recruiting efforts. Angela Bauer and Brian Augustine set out key decision points in scoping out the new future-facing Wanek Building, and they detail innovative laboratory, planetarium, and classroom features High Point selected to equip students with workforce-ready technical skills and a scientific mindset. They illustrate efficiencies in space, equipment, and operating costs available by putting three disciplines under one roof.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

New construction and repurposing solutions for next-gen engineering programs

Align your institution’s capital plans with the explosive growth of integrated engineering programs, or risk losing the competitive edge in recruiting and retaining students, faculty, and researchers, and collaborating with industry partners. Sharon Wood distills must-have building features and lessons learned from UT Austin’s latest engineering facility capital project initiatives: The Energy Education and Research Center, Energy Engineering Building (under construction), and the renovation of a historic gymnasium to create centralized flexible space for interdisciplinary robotics research programs. She examines infrastructure requirements current and future engineering programs.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

MIT Media Lab findings on long-term maker space productivity

MIT’s Media Lab is the granddaddy of successful industry/academic maker spaces. Keys to its long-term viability include a proven discovery model and enough facility flexibility to support the demands of highly creative minds from a wide variety of disciplines. Jessica Tsymbal identifies facility design elements, infrastructure features, and operating strategies that have kept Media Lab on the leading edge including its corporate sponsorship model, space allocation strategies, training prerequisites, occupancy expectations, and material and equipment flow. She illustrates solutions for accommodating the type of unique, short-term, and resource-demanding projects common to today’s collaborative research.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

Research facilities features to accelerate discovery-to-market and bench-to-bedside

In this session you’ll see facility strategies for accelerating speed to market, integrating emerging technologies, better equipping the biopharmaceutical and biomanufacturing workforce, and delivering space to attract industry partners. Session leaders examine today’s regulatory compliance and scalability drivers that are driving facility design decisions, and they identify best practices for developing “GMP-like” environments, advancing new bio therapies for commercial and clinical translation, attracting and retaining talent, leveraging partner capabilities, and linking research to manufacturing readiness. They profile the facility infrastructure Georgia Tech is putting in place to establish a leadership position in healthcare innovation, precision medicine, biomanufacturing, and value-based healthcare delivery.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
AIA Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Intelligent integrated solutions for controlling the total research lab environment

New intelligent technologies that combine control and management of HVAC, containment, lighting, and daylighting in a single platform are enabling organizations to move beyond the traditional (and costly) “lab as energy consumer” approach to a holistic operating efficiency strategy. Paul Fuson demonstrates the advantages of Siemens’ Total Room Automation for Life Science in engaging building operators, energy managers, EHS officers, lab managers, and scientists to significantly impact energy consumption, operations, safety and compliance. He illustrates new technology implementations, and new ways of using old technologies, to monitor utilization, improve interaction of lab occupants and building systems, and deliver safe and efficient buildings.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Building and fire codes: Lab design, construction, and operational considerations

This webcast provides a brief overview of United States building and fire codes as they relate to laboratory design, construction, and operations. Jacob Werner and Jeremy Lebowitz detail code requirements that govern chemical use in buildings including control areas, laboratory suites, and high hazard occupancies. Using diagrams and examples, the presenters illustrate how hazmat limits determine decision making on lab design and construction.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
AIA Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Co-working space for the entrepreneurial mindset: Furniture, space types, and equipment strategies

Owners from every industry are being challenged to add high-energy, active, engaging, collaborative work environments that attract the best minds, build outstanding teams, and radiate productivity. In this session, leaders detail the design of Harvard’s Pagliuca Life Lab and identify the impact of furniture, technology, spatial relationships, and programming on collaboration and culture in a startup environment. They describe the impacts of building zones intended to create both public and private areas, and how modular design supports group and individual work, flexibility, and offers a quicker solution to space crunches for evolving programs. 

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

The rise of Community Learning Centers (CLCs) in residential facilities: Programming and design strategies for student success

The growing trend to integrate student education within residence halls is accelerating, and this session delivers valuable insights into the programming, design, and operational processes from institutional and student perspectives. Calling upon three case studies of recently completed CLCs, session leaders set out design intentions and metrics, highlight innovative space solutions and features, and provide post-occupancy feedback from all stakeholders. They identify special resources and amenities for boosting student engagement, collaboration, and interaction, and contributing to students' quality of work and sense of community responsibility. They examine alternative design strategies for a range of new construction, renovation, and demographic drivers.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Rethinking administrative staff space at the campus level: New workstyles, locations, and spaces

Faced with high demand for admin offices, changing needs, and shortages of space, how can institutions restructure their campus workplace strategy to optimize the amounts, types, and locations for staff? Calling upon recent case studies of campus-scale administrative space strategies for large institutions, Elliot Felix delivers lessons learned and a proven process for assessing quality, quantity, and location of office space; introducing new workplace standards; making long-term decisions; and making the operational and organizational changes required to implement a dramatically more effective and effective staff space program across the campus.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Three case studies: Programming processes that unite and manage disparate interests in a single building

Single-program buildings are a thing of the past. The new norm is collocating multiple programs in a single building, and the associated challenges of reconciling conflicting priorities, delivering on special requirements and space needs, and managing expectations. Session leaders profile three multidisciplinary building projects and lay out a proven process for building consensus. They examine a set of tools for prioritizing and right-sizing space requirements, identify new space types capable of serving multiple needs, and provide insight into maximizing the use of capital and planning and programming space for disparate groups with populations ranging from 1,500 to 6,000.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00