Four critical academic spaces, and new strategies that move the needle on student engagement

This session examines new space strategies for four primary academic space types - classrooms, research laboratories, collaboration spaces, and maker spaces - that are upending the status quo and leading the way toward vastly improved student engagement. Charles Kirby and Brian Tucker illustrate evidence-based strategies and facility solutions that deliver opportunities for academic innovation for students across multiple disciplines to engage, learn, collaborate, and invent.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

The top facility planning considerations for experiential learning

Experiential learning has risen to the forefront of education programs in health sciences, engineering, athletics, robotics, veterinary science, and more, and the pervasive growth of this pedagogy presents a new set of opportunities and challenges for higher education space planning and management. Session leaders examine how simulation-based pedagogy is being driven by the convergence of virtual reality, prototyping, energy efficiency, full-immersion sensory tactics, interdisciplinary approaches, and data harvesting. They demonstrate top planning solutions for creating hands-on and in-situ learning space on campus, including how acoustics, light control, transparency, flexibility, and spatial movement are impacted by the practical constraints of experiential learning spaces.  

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Facility planning solutions for the rise of campus-wide wellness initiatives

The value of campus-wide wellness and well-being efforts toward improving student success is being widely embraced by university leaders -- a dynamic which has kicked off capital plans for an array of new and renovated spaces. Eric Hawkes identifies facility types and campus locations that are prime candidates for housing wellness initiatives. He sets out space and equipment planning metrics for embedded and standalone facilities, and examines the efficiencies provided by new, blended, multi-use facilities that engage multiple stakeholder groups including athletics, wellness, medical and healthcare services and counseling.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

100% active learning space: A case study of the 94,000-sf Anteater Learning Pavilion at UC Irvine

One hundred percent active learning + flexible furniture + wireless connectivity throughout = student collaboration and engagement on steroids. This is the Anteater Learning Pavilion, designed around the very best educational research to improve learning outcomes through a variety of flexible classrooms, informal student study spaces, and lounges that include a mix of mobile furniture, wireless connectivity, and new projection and display technology. Michael Dennin delivers an armchair tour of the cutting-edge facility, and relates planning decisions and metrics for capacity, group sizes, and space types, how the technology is being used by students and faculty, and lessons learned. 

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

Interdisciplinary research labs: The new facility benchmarks and metrics you need to know

New interdisciplinary research facility planning data is surfacing after several years of operational experience, and this session coalesces the new workplace benchmarks and metrics that will be critical for your next project. Session leaders demonstrate programming, design, and operational metrics, data, and benchmarks that promise robust workplace communications, improved face-time among disciplines, increased sharing of scientific tools, and faster speed to market of research findings. They illustrate the effects of space type diversity within interdisciplinary environments on strategic planning, programming, and design, and they compare allocation metrics across a variety of scientific programs. 

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
AIA Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

A new standard for centralized scientific cores

The latest, greatest model for centralized scientific core facilities is MIT.nano, where 2,000 MIT researchers in more than 150 research groups will use the most advanced research labs, fabrication tools, and materials processing capabilities available including cleanroom, imaging, and prototyping facilities for disciplines spanning energy, health, life sciences, quantum sciences, electronics, and manufacturing.  Session leaders illustrate the rationales for the central site selection and interconnection with neighboring buildings, and detail the academic vision, collaborative features, programmatic makeup, environmental controls, and high-performance features. They compare project strategies with recent centralized research projects at other institutions.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
AIA Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Research facilities that adapt readily to major program changes – even while under construction!

Long-term facility adaptability is one of the most significant drivers in research facility design, and major program changes while under construction really put adaptability features to the test. In this session, Tim Reynolds and Patrick Jones demonstrate adaptability in action with a case study of a building programmed for research groups experiencing a mid-construction program change toward clinical training and education. They detail future-proofing strategies for infrastructure and pathways, and how large wet lab research spaces can be converted into clinical spaces – with the potential to be reverted back in the future. 

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
AIA Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

AstraZeneca South San Francisco Site: A new benchmark for collaborative lab-office environments and activity-based workplaces

Research industry facilities are now being developed with activity-based workplace designs supporting new collaborative lab-office environments, distinctive amenities, shared resources, and an abundance of natural light. AstraZeneca’s just-opened South San Francisco Site is a leading example of this type of next-generation research workplace. Martin Sharpless and Paul Long illustrate the design rationales, space allocation metrics, designs for collaboration, and the amenities that attract talent and promote innovation. They address efficient space allocation, equipment and lab support shared-access strategies. They also deliver valuable lessons learned from construction through initial occupancy and operations.

Continuing Education
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
0.50

Renovation or new construction? Programmatic, infrastructure, and cost considerations

The easy answer to increased demand for STEM space is to build a new facility, but underappreciated and underutilized older buildings are too often overlooked as a potential resource. John Starr and Ben Elliott examine build new vs. renovate decision-making rationales being employed to meet increased space requirements, and they identify cost mitigation effects of responsive programming and facility reuse. They enumerate key functional needs for STEM facilities including awide array of new space types that respond to the increasingly team-based, collaborative, and interdisciplinary activities. They demonstrate how new construction or reuse might best support the next generation research and learners.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
AIA Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00

Amherst College Science Center: A new facility benchmark for the idealized science program

The new interdisciplinary Science Center is Amherst College’s response to surging science program enrollment, the demand for updated science facilities, and the need for active learning space on campus. Session leaders illustrate how the opportunity to create an idealized program reshaped decisions on department layouts for optimal space use and collaboration efficiency. They profile active learning lab and classroom solutions and examine new space types, adjacencies, and attributes for growth, flexibility, new pedagogies, and enhanced student-to-faculty ratios. They demonstrate achievements in sustainability and energy efficiency that surpass national benchmarks.

Continuing Education
American Institute of Architects (AIA)
 
1.00
AIA Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW)
 
1.00
Professional Development Hour (PDH)
 
1.00