Alternative Work Styles

Defining the New Lab of the Future

Survey Findings Disrupt Common Assumptions of Open Labs and Collaborative Research Space

Published 10-14-2015

The phrase “lab of the future” typically refers to a flexible, open floorplan designed to promote collaboration and cross-pollination between researchers. But these buzzwords have been used for decades, with open labs dating back to the mid-’60s and flexible casework to the mid-’80s. So how successful have these features been, and what defines the lab of the future in 2015 and beyond?

Increased Daylight and Modular, Open Space Improve Outlook and Productivity

Strategies for Healthier Research Facilities

Published 9-23-2015

Diverse projects in New York, New Jersey, and Maryland demonstrate that integrating flexible infrastructure, collaborative work styles, daylight, and sustainability all contribute to a “health-positive” scientific research environment, a concept derived from neurological and behavioral research indicating that access to natural light and human interaction improve well-being and productivity.

Space Design Should Reflect a Company’s Needs, Not Latest Trends

Knowing Your Organizational DNA is Important to Making Good Choices

Published 4-1-2015

To achieve the most viable, successful workspaces, companies need to look closely at the factors that most directly influence their work culture instead of following the latest design trends, according to Kay Sargent, director of workplace strategies at Lend Lease. No single workplace design fits every company, and a workspace should fit the people using it, as well as the organizational goals.

Maximizing Operating Efficiency of High-Containment Labs

Select Agent Experiment Conducted in 30 Days, Thanks to Staffing and Management Model

Published 1-21-2015

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center’s Regional Biocontainment Lab (RBL) recently organized and launched a select-agent-based study in just 30 days from inception to conclusion, thanks to the organization’s highly efficient operational framework. Fast tracking of the study—which involved aerosol exposure of 38 immunized mice to Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia—was made possible through the facility’s strategic management and cross-trained staffing model.

Shared Office Space for Physicians and Clinicians

Beth Israel Deaconess is Among the First Hospitals to Introduce the Concept for Academic Medical Offices

Published 1-14-2015

The renovated OB-GYN academic offices at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) eliminate private offices in favor of shared desks and open concept space, to accommodate a planned 20 percent staff increase while decreasing total departmental square footage. The department, which previously housed about 80 people in 14,000 sf, can now accommodate 106 people in 13,000 sf. The gut-and-rebuild also improves ADA compliance for the 1950s building and provides more natural light and collaborative space.

Optimizing Facility Operations Without Building New Spaces

Capacity Assessment and Capability-Expanding Initiatives Can Achieve Goals

Published 1-7-2015

Facility managers can achieve optimal performance by “sweating their assets”—making existing assets work harder—through a careful analysis of what factors contribute to the highest throughput and then undertaking initiatives that will help them reach those goals. Doing so may eliminate the need to create expensive new space but may require facility redesign, says Cyrus Yang, executive director of delivery system planning for Kaiser Permanente.

Space Strategies 2015

November 16-17, 2015
San Diego, CA

This conference details new space planning and space management strategies (metrics, policies, processes, technologies, tools, and facility planning concepts) that are delivering major financial, productivity, and work-culture gains in academic, private sector, and government workplaces.

Interprofessional Resource Sharing at Academic Medical Facilities

Benefits: Space Efficiencies, Enhanced Collaboration, and Better Patient Care

Published 10-1-2014

As health science education becomes increasingly interprofessional, the design of academic medical facilities is changing to reflect this new type of learning. Collaboration is the cornerstone of interprofessional medicine, as health care providers strive to offer the best patient care. Nurturing such collaboration begins in the educational facilities where students from multiple disciplines learn the importance of working together.

Unassigned Seating and No Offices at GSK’s Corporate Office

“SMART Working" is a Strategic Business Tool, Not a Commodity

Published 9-3-2014

With no private offices or assigned seats, not even for top executives, employees at GlaxoSmithKline’s (GSK) corporate office at the Philadelphia Navy Yard work in a variety of work settings. Work spaces include the atrium, the cafeteria, sit-to-stand workstations, quiet rooms, meeting rooms, and even the rooftop.

Streamlining the Research Approval Process

Toronto’s University Health Network Implements an Online System for Clinical Research Review

Published 7-9-2014

The Coordinated Approval Process for Clinical Research (CAPCR) is a web-based application that streamlines the approval process required to conduct research using human subjects. Designed to help researchers and hospital staff navigate the process of coordinating and tracking clinical research within a hospital system, CAPCR gives an institution time to plan for the infrastructure a line of research will necessitate, and to mitigate any associated safety hazards. CAPCR automates the approval process, avoids duplication, and creates an online repository for study-related information, allowing faster approval times and greater access to information. It also eliminates the need for paper application forms, helps researchers ensure they have the necessary approvals for their studies, and provides an efficient way to obtain authorizations from multiple departments and track approvals online. The system is being marketed as a tool for use in other hospitals.